Home | Calendar | Español | Media Room | Shop | Contact Us

Speech

My daughter is 3 years old and used to say “Mum, Dad, Granny, Grandpa, give me”, now she doesn’t say any of those words. I think that she can learn to talk but she needs time and treatment. What I can do now? She walks, sits alone, plays with toys, sings, and draws.

The information you have provided about your daughter leads me to believe she will be able to talk. You said in your letter that she used to say, "Mum, Dad, Granny, Grandpa" and "give me." Now you say she is singing, drawing and playing with toys. These are all good signs that she will be able to talk again.

It seems that almost all people with CdLS have oral-motor apraxia, which means they need help making words or other voluntary movements with their mouth. I believe your daughter knows the meaning of many words, but can not easily say them. Someone needs to help her and try the following activities with her.

  1. Gather together some things she likes, for example toys or food.
  2. In a playful manner, hold one of the items near your mouth and say the name of it several times. Say the name very slowly, at two seconds per syllable, and use inflection, almost like singing.
  3. Encourage her to imitate you.
  4. Give a lot of praise for any attempt she makes.
  5. Her first words may not sound exactly like yours, but if she uses them consistently, they are words for her.

She may get frustrated if unable to communicate and you may want to consider alternative methods of communication in the meantime. This might include sign language, communication board, or other pictures/symbols.

MG/TK 7-13-10



Ask The Expert Home Page > S > CdLS Expert Entry: Speech

Legal Disclaimer:  Please take note that the CdLS Foundation's Ask the Expert service is comprised of volunteer professionals in various areas of focus. Response times may vary and a response is not guaranteed. Answers are not considered a medical, behavioral, or educational consultation. Ask the Expert is not a substitute for the care and attention your child's personal physician, psychologist, educational consultant, or social worker can deliver.